Pinned toot

Finally making my . I'm Nate TeBlunthuis. I'm graduate student in communicaiton studying cooperative communities (especially online, like Wikipedia). I'm not hear for research, but to hang out with other people who care about the future of cooperative organization. I'm also into free/libre software and social movements. My website is teblunthuis.cc

Grateful for many brave people in the free software community and excited for the future ahead of us.

Linux is more than Linus.

GNU and the FSF are more than RMS.

How about we see what kind of movement we can build if we centre the kind of people that the assholes and creeps of F/LOSS drove away?

I ❤️ wikichron! Javier Arroyo presenting updates and interesting network analysis of hitchhiking Wikis at . opensym.org/wp-content/uploads

Mubashrah Saddiqa talked about surveying teachers in students as part of a project to advance the use of Open Data in Danish classrooms. I think it's interesting to think about potential ways that open localized data can help teachers relate concept abstract concepts to their student's daily lives and urban environments. opensym.org/wp-content/uploads

I thought Mattia Gasparini's presentation on "rich club" networks in open source projects was pretty interesting! Pretty much all of the biggest projects on Gibhub evince some degree of rich club behavior. opensym.org/wp-content/uploads

He says that just because something's a good idea doesn't mean it's appropriate for a license. It might be better for a formalized norm like a certification.

One of the fascinating ideas is that of "available components" which would allow projects to exclude sources for components that are readily available. But the Cern OSH license doesn't include them instead treating the practice of using available components as a community norm.

One of the fascinating ideas is that of "available components" which would allow projects to exclude sources for components that are readily available. But the Cern OSH license doesn't include them instead treating the practice of using available components as a community norm.

They didn't do it. I'm not sure why, perhaps due to legal complexities in the style of other restrictive or non-commercial clauses.

He explores the question of using copyleft to prohibit undesirable behaviors like sustainability, repairability, and safety.

Exciting keynote by Andrew Katz on how they developed the Open Hardware License in the style of the GPL to built an open hardware commons.

Carla S. R. Aguiar presented a really exciting project on a modular system to allow non-experts to develop FAQ chatbots. They already have an active community of users who are making their own chatbots.

opensym.org/wp-content/uploads

I'm at . The academic conference for open collaboration. I'm going to toot / tweet some highlights over the next few days. The entire proceedings are open access so I can link everyone to the entire papers.

What's a better organization software than a zsh with org mode files and rgrep?

I saw Janelle Monea last night and she was great!

What's new from Zuck: ""including about encryption and its ability to take power from centralized systems and put it back in people’s hands. Those values will always be at the heart of WhatsApp.”

-- techcrunch.com/2018/04/30/jan-

My new paper w/ @groceryheist and Aaron Shaw shows that big wikis tend to grow and decline in a way that looks eerily similar to English Wikipedia. mako.cc/copyrighteous/revisiti

@groceryheist will present the work on Thursday at .

Excited to share this new blog post on my research: blog.communitydata.cc/revisiti

The pool of active contributors to Wikipedia started declining in 2007. Researchers blamed a calcifying bureaucracy and hostility to newcomers. Are these problems in other wiki communities too? Could there be a deeper reason why these dynamics emerge?

I replicated Halfaker et al 2013's analysis of 'The rise and decline.' The dynamics observed in Wikipedia appear to reoccur again and again in many wiki communities.

Loic Tallon, Chief Digital Officer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (the largest art museum in the United States), about the success of & collaboration with :

"At The Met, more people (ten million a month) are now experiencing The Met collection on Wikipedia than on metmuseum.org (two million a month). Furthermore, they’re doing so in languages and contexts that are near impossible for The Met to replicate and support on its own website."

medium.com/freely-sharing-the-

Show more
social.coop

social.coop is a cooperatively-run corner of the Fediverse. The instance is democratically governed by its members, who generally share an interest in the co-op model, but topics of discussion range widely.

If you are interested in joining our community, please review our Bylaws and Code of Conduct. If you agree with them, you may apply for membership on our instance via this link

Our instance is supported by sliding scale contributions of $1-10/mo made via Open Collective. You must have an active Open Collective account to apply for membership; you may set one up here