Pinned toot

We still have a tech position open at the Freedom of the Press Foundation (a nonprofit): a Sr. Software Engineer position to work on SecureDrop, the open source whistleblower platform used by 65+ media organizations, originally developed by the late Aaron Swartz.

You get paid to work
✅ from anywhere in the world
✅ on a world-changing project
✅ that's open source,
✅ stewarded by a small team
✅ that's led by a woman.

Help spreading the word is much appreciated:

freedom.press/jobs/job-opening

✔️ federation
✔️ renewable energy
✔️ cooperatives

Sounds good to me.. anyone know more about ii?

"REScoop.eu is the European federation of renewable energy cooperatives. We are a growing network of 1,250 European energy cooperatives and their 1.000.000 citizens who are active in the energy transition."

rescoop.eu/

If you want to see how industry lobbying works... a before lobbying and after lobbying side-by-side on proposed EC environmental measures to make home appliances more repairable and longer lasting.

eeb.org/publications/80/produc

"If one product like #Chromium has enough market share, then it becomes easier for web developers and businesses to decide not to worry if their services and sites work with anything other than Chromium. That’s what happened when #Microsoft had a monopoly on browsers in the early 2000s before #Firefox was released. And it could happen again.

If you care about what’s happening with online life today, take another look at Firefox." blog.mozilla.org/blog/2018/12/ #edge

If you remember that unedifying "Intellectual Dark Web" article in the NYT by Bari Weiss,you might enjoy this -- I guess you could call it a cover version -- by Current Affairs:

currentaffairs.org/2018/12/mee

"He’s quite physically striking, the tall and handsome Lharpeneth, Emperor of the Outer Novae, Splendid Are His Plunder-Houses. He beams at me. 'All I desire is to benefit the citizens of this universe. What crime is there in gently ushering unemployed aliens to my asteroid mines?'"

https://librelounge.org/ , by @cwebber and @emacsen

"Libre Lounge is a podcast where we casually discuss various topics involving user freedom, crossing free software, free culture, network and hosting freedom, and libre hardware designs. We discuss everything from policy and licensing to deep dives on technical topics... whatever seems interesting that week. At some point we might even have guests!"

A quick review from the long weekend, "The Art of Point-And-Click Adventure Games", a lovingly made art book about a gaming genre I adore. If you also grew up with games like Monkey Island and Zak McKracken and liked them as much as I did, you might want to check it out. My review:

lib.reviews/review/5a9e1fd1-7a

You can't get this one on Amazon's US site -- but directly from the publisher in the UK, Bitmap Books:

bitmapbooks.co.uk/collections/

On the occasion of Thanksgiving, I finished David Stannard's "American Holocaust", a seminal work about the genocides of the Americas, and wrote up my thoughts.

In short, I highly recommend the book -- it was published in 1992, but remains a remarkable work of historical scholarship that draws from countless sources to present a comprehensive picture of what happened, and why it happened. Here's my review:

lib.reviews/american-holocaust

Really enjoying the Duolingo Spanish podcasts. Engaging first-person stories, with helpful English narration in between, high production values; as far as I can tell, the audio is completely ad-free, + there are transcripts and vocabulary guides. Really nicely done, hope they keep it up:

podcast.duolingo.com/

Even in 2018 we're still finding lovely frescoes in Pompeii, and The Guardian couldn't resist a pun: "Take me to your Leda".

theguardian.com/world/2018/nov

Nice vid from the dig on Italian TV:

twitter.com/tg2rai/status/1064

I've been off Mastodon for a while, due to... basically upending my whole deal and joining a nonprofit investigative journalism startup: themarkup.org. Incidentally, we've got a log of hiring to do. Please have a look and send on to people who might like to see the opportunities in this first round! Most are based in New York, but I have a couple remote-friendly positions in there too:
grnh.se/bcdc38022

Quickie review of Stephen King's latest, "Elevation".

lib.reviews/review/ad5ae57d-7f

tl;dr: Even if you're a fan you can safely skip this one, or wait until the ebook price comes down.

Playing with Blokada, open source ad blocker for Android that works as a local VPN -- thereby blocking ads across browsers/apps. Neat idea! (H/T to a @lib_reviews user for posting a review.)

blokada.org/

If you needed a reason to install @fdroidorg (free software app store for Android) -- according to their site, Blokada "isn't allowed on Google Play because it interferes with Google's business model".

Review from the weekend: "Bad Blood" by John Carreyrou, the definitive book about the Theranos saga by the investigative journalist who broke it.

At its peak, Theranos was valued at $10B. If the company had not been stopped, their flaky tests might have killed people--we may never know the true extent of the damage they did do to people's lives. At the heart of the story are self-delusion, blind ambition, paranoia, infatuation.

Full review here:

lib.reviews/review/02f8947b-e4

Finished "American Prison" by Shane Bauer yesterday. Bauer worked undercover as a prison guard for a private prison in Louisiana. He interweaves his experiences there with a review of the long history of incarceration for profit in the United States.

It's a compelling and necessary book, if exhausting. Full review (CW: descriptions of violence, including a photograph):

lib.reviews/review/0a67d7aa-da

We still have a tech position open at the Freedom of the Press Foundation (a nonprofit): a Sr. Software Engineer position to work on SecureDrop, the open source whistleblower platform used by 65+ media organizations, originally developed by the late Aaron Swartz.

You get paid to work
✅ from anywhere in the world
✅ on a world-changing project
✅ that's open source,
✅ stewarded by a small team
✅ that's led by a woman.

Help spreading the word is much appreciated:

freedom.press/jobs/job-opening

"Unthinkable" by Helen Thomson was an entertaining enough read about people with unusual minds (either congenitally so, or as a result of some accident or disease). E.g., one of the folks she portrays thought for a long time that he was dead; another hyper-empathizes with people to such a degree that he physically experiences touch, pain, etc.

A bit on the shallow side but if you're looking for a quick pop sci read, you could do worse. Full review:

lib.reviews/review/757ef838-f8

Finished Stephen Kinzer's "Overthrow" (2006) a few days ago. While being an older book, it's still a decent introduction mainly to the 20th century history of US imperialism, with some significant limitations.

3.5 of 5. Full review:

lib.reviews/overthrow

Margaret Talbot's "The Myth of Whiteness in Classical Sculpture" in the New Yorker is very much worth the read. This is about the true colors of antiquity--and antiquity was very colorful indeed.

newyorker.com/magazine/2018/10

The article inspired me to write a quick review of the book/exhibit "Gods in Color" that's mentioned in it, which I read a few weeks ago:

lib.reviews/review/107ae195-7e

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social.coop

social.coop is a a coop-run corner of the fediverse, a cooperative and transparent approach to operating a social platform. We are currently closed to new memberships while we improve our internal processes and policies, and plan to re-open to new folks when that work is complete. [9/2/2018]