Charles Stanhope is a user on social.coop. You can follow them or interact with them if you have an account anywhere in the fediverse.

Charles Stanhope @cstanhope@social.coop

Pinned toot

Hello, fediverse. I'm Charles from the USA in the , OR area. I'm excited to be on as I'm hoping it will prove a viable alternative to the "free" social sites.

I make and for a living, and I dabble in for hobbies. Other interests not limited to: , , , , , and .

@ajroach42 Another handy service that The Internet Archive operates is purl.org, which is a free service for setting permanent URLs. If you like to host your own media, but you have to move hosts/domains sometimes, PURL is good for when you want to say, "I always want a page for my album to be available at purl.org/me/myalbum". Then you can move around its actual URL however much you need to.

"To retain this status quo, ISPs have spent decades writing and buying state laws that prohibit towns and cities from exploring community owned and operated broadband networks (...) which not only hamstring municipal broadband providers, but often ban towns and cities from striking public/private partnerships."

Community owned ISPs are offering better service and lower fees? Better squash them in the name of the Holy Free Market!

motherboard.vice.com/en_us/art

US Appalachia coal history Show more

(Sorry for the overexposed picture. In situations like this one, I have to play a trick on my phone by blocking the sensor for a bit so it ramps up the exposure. I then remove my hand. As it drops the exposure, I try to snap the picture at a moment that lets you see his black fur.)

Portland area cats probably don't get enough sunlight. This was my cat's reaction immediately after I opened the blinds this morning and placed him on one of his blankets.

social.coop/media/9-Od9jpdcznz

I think the primary conceit of our time that we won't recognise until later is that we think we can expose ourselves to constant barrages of partisan content, advertising, and messages insidiously designed to appeal to our strongest fears and desires, and somehow emerge with the core of our character unscathed. It's the smoking of the 21st century. It is a very real thing that we don't yet fully understand and are pretty sure is bad for us.

Not that #45 even deserves anyone's time, but this is a great thread from birdsite about #haiti and how it has been systematically disenfranchised by both the US and Europe - threadreaderapp.com/thread/951 a great history lesson and good promotion for Katz's new book, which is now on my TO READ list.

Hey Mastodon Hive Mind, I could do with some help!

I'm writing a blog post about how the project I'm leading for (a new social network for educators based on open content and professional development) will be 'safe'.

If you've got resources for what it means for a site / network to be 'safe' I'd love to read them to inform my work.

Incidentally, I think that the ActivityPub protocol (on which Mastodon is based) looks like a great basis on which to build this project.

Please re-toot!

uspol: gerrymandering Show more

uspol: gerrymandering Show more

#Mozilla starts to release #Pocket as Free Software under the MIT license. Great start, I hope the rest will follow... Nevertheless I'm happy with my #Wallabag. ;)
github.com/Pocket

Does anyone know of or written an article on how to use Mastodon? I've got at least two people who've made their way here from Twitter who could use some help.

I'm not talking about articles about Mastodon, but actual articles on how to use it. Tutorials, if you will.

Is your institution a W3C member? Do you like decentralised social networks? You probably do since you're reading this on Mastodon. Ask your AC rep to vote on ActivityPub today! (or, before the 16th of Jan). If your instance is up to date, you're probably using this standard right now. It would be a shame if it didn't become an official W3C Recommendation.

AP: w3.org/TR/activitypub

Link to vote (only visible to AC reps): w3.org/2002/09/wbs/33280/activ

Homeless Patients Get Novel Treatment From Chicago Hospitals: Housing Show more

Just got word that I'll be speaking again at this year's #LibrePlanet! I was going to attend regardless, but I'm very excited to be able to continue to build off of last year's talk.

The title of this year's talk is The Ethics Void. Here's a rough abstract:

Medicine, legal, finance, journalism, scientific research—each of these fields and many others have widely adopted codes of ethics governing the lives of their professionals. Some of these codes may even be enshrined in law. And this is for good reason: these are fields that have enormous consequences.

Software and technology pervade not only through these fields, but through virtually every aspect of our lives. Yet, when compared to other fields, our community leaders and educators have produced an ethics void. Last year, I introduced numerous topics concerning #privacy, #security, and #freedom that raise serious ethical concerns. Join me this year as we consider some of those examples and others in an attempt to derive a code of ethics that compares to each of these other fields, and to consider how leaders and educators should approach ethics within education and guidance.

My previous talks can be found here:
https://mikegerwitz.com/talks

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For this talk, I want to solicit the community at various points. I know what _I_ want to talk about, but what are some of the most important ethical issues to _you_? Unfortunately there's far too much to fit into a 40m talk! Also feel free to e-mail me at mtg@gnu.org.

Fellow Portland OR folks, please note that there's a rally happening on 1/14 to push for municipal broadband in PDX. A municipal solution can help us protect net neutrality and put users first.

If this is an approach you support, the event details are over on FB (no account required to view): facebook.com/events/1775718709

I'll be there :)

'Accessible infrastructure alone isn’t enough. For people to take advantage of affordable broadband, they also need a base level of technical literacy, as well as an understanding of what they can do with the Internet. Together, these are the building blocks of “digital equity,” a condition that the NDIA defines as one in which “all individuals and communities have the information technology capacity needed for full participation in our society, democracy and economy."'

thenation.com/article/the-new-