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Question: How do people feel about fiction collective (with shared IP) using creative commons?

I've been talking with people about this and want to hear more thoughts.

My current opinion is that it would limit prospects for adaptation of written work into film and television, but I could be mistaken on this. Would a studio want to adapt a work under CC?

Secondary question (equally important in my opinion): Is popular work the only work worth of sustained stability and livelihood?

*popular, meaning, successful enough that open access doesn't affect its economic viability*

My thinking is that art for small communities should also be sustainable, even if readership/engagement is limited. I think some form of solidarity should allow such art to exist with livelihood attached (the same way academic work is supported even when engagement is low).

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Question: How do people feel about fiction collective (with shared IP) using creative commons?

I've been talking with people about this and want to hear more thoughts.

My current opinion is that it would limit prospects for adaptation of written work into film and television, but I could be mistaken on this. Would a studio want to adapt a work under CC?

*Note: Art can have a niche following and still be acclaimed. Such art often has value for its fandom AND other artists.*

I think solidarity between artists (collectives, co-ops, shared IP) could allow for niche art to provide livelihood for artists.

I also think solidarity work could be a place where artists can grow and develop their craft while getting stability in return.

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Secondary question (equally important in my opinion): Is popular work the only work worth of sustained stability and livelihood?

*popular, meaning, successful enough that open access doesn't affect its economic viability*

My thinking is that art for small communities should also be sustainable, even if readership/engagement is limited. I think some form of solidarity should allow such art to exist with livelihood attached (the same way academic work is supported even when engagement is low).

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Big names can afford to loosen restrictions and open up access to their work, while being able to negotiate with the traditional industry. Artists with more niche or smaller followings may find that option not viable if the want to live off their work.

So the larger question I'm asking is: how do we open up access while actually creating livelihood for artists?

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and it is one of the only industries (areas of work) where people (both consumers and even some artists) don't expect/believe workers should be able to live off their work. On the other hand, everyone recognizes its value and it is a 760 billion dollar industry (news.artnet.com/art-world/nea-) that provides the livelihood of millions of workers (but often not the artists themselves).

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*I know a lot of this is getting into the weeds, but I've seen a divide here when I talk to writer/artists friends. Some people like giving full access to their work/freeing up control of their IP, while others want to compensated for access/and optioning rights. I think it is a labor question as much as a question about the commons. Artists are constantly exploited for their work ---

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*The problem would really come from adapting larger work (anthologies and novels) in print and Ebook, but I know writers often post their books on their site as well. Same question applies: is CC necessary?

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*(In the speculative fiction market at least) A lot of short fiction is already available online for free. If the collective is writing primarily short stories and making them accessible online, is it necessary to use CC, especially when they're making their money off of site visits, subscriptions, ads, etc.?

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More thoughts:

*A fiction collective optioning their work for adaptation is a really good revenue generator, but it also allows for the collective's work to reach a wider audience. Both are helpful towards building stability within the collective (paid positions, benefits, long-term viability of the collective, etc.)

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Question: How do people feel about fiction collective (with shared IP) using creative commons?

I've been talking with people about this and want to hear more thoughts.

My current opinion is that it would limit prospects for adaptation of written work into film and television, but I could be mistaken on this. Would a studio want to adapt a work under CC?

I'm a speculative fiction writer looking for worker-owners willing to talk about their work at a co-op.It is research for a novel series I'm working on. Any takers? For more details on work I've done here's a link: cadwellturnbull.com/publicatio

Boosts appreciated!

This thread was specifically about short fiction in speculative (sci-fi, fantasy, horror, slipstream) magazines, but I'm sure some of the thinking could be applied more broadly. Also sure people are working on this in other media.

Any thoughts/minutia/context anyone wants to add, I'd love to hear.

Been thinking about this for a while and need some knowledge.

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Individual mags wouldn’t change their practices at all. They can (and should) also continue to do what they’ve always done on their own platforms. But this is an added benefit and a culture building tool. Even a little of this applied could be useful.

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What goes into the library would depend on (1)How many copies individual mags donate AND (2) how many copies are bought (at a discount) by community members for other community members. We’d collectively be deciding just how accessible the art would be (mags, creators, fans).

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Offerings: subs to all mags at a reasonable discount, ability to buy bundles/curated mag selections by theme or genre, ab. to buy individual stories, ab. to gift mags/bundles to other people, a community managed library with issues/stories/bundles that can be “checked out.”

A community online library is super important because it fosters two cultural attitudes simultaneously: Art Has Value no matter the length or format & art should be accessible to everyone (without short-changing artists).

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Cooperative associations have been done before (think Associated Press) and cooperative platforms also exist (think Resonate Coop). The spec mags would retain autonomy but would have a common platform to distribute as a community.

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Here’s the thought experiment (redux): An association of spec mags on a cooperative platform (like Amazon but co-owned/co-managed by the spec community (editors/curators, readers, authors, artists, & other creatives). Think SFWA, but consumer facing.

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THREAD I shared this with my speculative fiction community.

Boosts welcome.

Thoughts SUPER welcome.

With the recent closing of spec mags, a thought keeps returning to me: solidarity economics could (possibly, maybe, potentially in an “easier said than done” way) produce some added stability for mags.

There have to be more than 7 people who want to come listen to, and converse with, @cadwellsocialcoop and @ntnsndr as they talk about their work writing both fiction and non-fiction about and the .

eventbrite.com/e/geo-get-toget

The tics are free if you already give GEO money, or if you're "living lightly." and available for a donation of your choosing to everyone else. And it's in cyberspace, so there's no excuse to not come join the fun.

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