"The revolution cannot be controlled by a vanguard of activists; if it is, it will fail. The revolution must be controlled by its participants, because only then will we learn how to claim agency over our own lives and futures."

Show thread

"Fascism is always best stamped out when it starts. It’s never safe to ignore it. Not now, not during any Mad Max future."

Show thread

"If you go hide in the woods with your stockpile and your buddies, and fascists take over, guess what? It’s kind of your fucking fault. Because you weren’t at the meeting when everyone decided whether to be egalitarians or fascists."

Show thread

Proposes "four priorities" for life:

"Act like we’re about to die. Act like we might not die right away. Act like we might have a chance to stop this. Act like everything will be okay."

Show thread

Lovely piece from Margaret Killjoy, published in December 2019 on her site, about how to live well in "these times". Feels even more relevant now, in August 2020.

birdsbeforethestorm.net/2019/1

"The bigger question is why big-city Democratic mayors are embracing Trump’s tough-on-crime reelection strategy. Each of these cities applied to be part of ORP; the Justice Department did not unilaterally impose it on them."

Show thread

"One of the problems with embracing federal police is their almost total lack of local or even federal accountability. Cities like Albuquerque, Atlanta, St. Paul, San Francisco, and Portland have all pulled out of federal-local task forces in the past because federal agents have violated local rules regarding racial profiling, use-of-force policies, and requirements to wear body cameras."

Show thread

"The Trump administration, desperate to divert attention from its abject failure of urban policy, thinks the road to reelection is paved with more policing and mass incarceration. The question remains, why are local Democrats supporting their efforts?"

Show thread

Alex Vitale writes in The Nation that Trump's tactic of inviting federal forces into cities is not new, and that in the case of ongoing Operation Relentless Pursuit, Democratic mayors are inviting Trump's federal forces into their cities. Why?

thenation.com/article/society/

"When you have a pandemic and an epidemic at the same time, it’s gonna require credible messengers,” Scott said. “The only way we’re going to reach the people that are most at risk of dying of gun violence and most at risk of contracting Covid is through credible messengers on the ground. People that Baltimoreans can relate to and trust.”

Show thread

"People don’t really understand public health,” Slutkin said. “Because most of our successes are invisible.”

Show thread

"There have been a lot of false accusations against these workers for the intention of hurting the program so that there can be a maintenance of an unthreatened status quo"

Show thread

"Violence interruption, created in Chicago by epidemiologist Gary Slutkin in 2000, views gun violence through an epidemiological lens and tries to prevent it with public health approaches."

Show thread

ProPublica doing the Cat's work, tracking police that attacked protesters and what, if anything, happened to them (where they disciplined, etc): projects.propublica.org/protes

(Tangentially, I believe companies that go fully remote will still have a need for periodic "in person" gatherings, which might make it much more common for a worker to have to travel long distance "for work". Some new problems and opportunities here.)

19/?

Show thread

Remote work is here to stay. Writing screeds about how it "sucks" might be fun, but the more interesting conversation is about what do we do about it.

How might we use remote work to make ourselves, our communities and our society stronger?

18/?

Show thread
Show more
social.coop

The social network of the future: No ads, no corporate surveillance, ethical design, and decentralization! Own your data with Mastodon!