I'm often wondering what to make of the claim that global poverty has dramatically reduced and the reason is capitalism. It's a heated area and I thought this article did a good job of exploring some of the viewpoints vox.com/future-perfect/2019/2/

I bought Hickel's book as I appreciate his perspective to widen the discussion into colonialism. I am a little wary of him being one sided though.

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Also interesting is this article explaining that in the period of the poverty reduction that both capitalism and state socialism grew ourworldindata.org/historical-

Hard to disentangle the two from that data.

(That site is part funded by Bill Gates Foundation, also part of y-combinator 2019 - so on the capitalist side of things)

Still though, this is all a very narrow view. Would also like to factor in the environmental impact too (China is the country that had biggest poverty change, but probably also biggest environmental change too?).

Also, getting out of poverty isn't the end of the story - plenty of empty despairing lives await. Has that gone up or down?

What about freedom from coercion? When I see "normal" society it seems highly coercive to me. Has that gone up or down?

I doubt much of this data is available.

youtube.com/watch?v=OoIcsj9ysv addresses some of those points, showing an increase in "deaths of despair" and the details hidden inside national averages.

...also makes the point of ideologically motivated selective fact sharing... a few facts are rarely the whole story.

@nicksellen
Looks like the typical claims of modernisation theory

@nicksellen my naive guess would be that the biggest impact on that graph is the reduction in the price of goods enabled by more efficient means of production.

Whether or not that increase in productivity is due to capitalism is a more complex question. Given that scientists are mostly motivated by curiosity and engineers by shiny new tech, I think we'd probably achieve similar progress without the accumulation of wealth and power, not without private property ownership and market economies though.

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