Follow

lol, 23andme retracted my 0.1% non-white ancestry.

I'm about as white as white gets. I used to describe my un-sun-altered skin color as "dead fishbelly white," and it still is, but only if I don't eat enough veggies.

@muninn
This is a kind of dumb reinforcement-of-historical-bias kinda thing though, because genetically and literally we're all descended from the same stock and geography. I find the skin-colour-based stratification silly, like asking how much brown-haired ancestry one has..
In post-apartheid cultures I get that it's strongly an identity thing, but genetics has little to do with racial identity beyond the grossest level.

@cathal Yeah, this is more "random crap that's fun to know" for me. I think a proper bill of sale would be "this is how well your genotype matches specific somewhat uncommon random mutations we find in people with long term pedigrees who pretty stably lived in region X." And the pedigree verification as to whether their sample base's ancestors were townies for 10 generations is still pretty poor...

@cathal ...for example, I'm mostly of English, Scottish and Irish descent according to 23andme. This jives well with what I know of my ancestry. But when 23andme gets down to the regional level, the strongest signal shows up in London, Manchester, Glasgow, and Dublin. I'm pretty sure this has less to do with my ancestors living in those major cities than it does with tons of ppl, including my distant relatives, having moved from country to city in the UK in the last 3 centuries.

@cathal And, this level of inexactitude is in one of 23andme's best coverage areas in terms of sample data to feed their ancestry algo. The matching of variants to region is far worse in other areas, particularly Africa - is anyone surprised?

Back when the algo thought I was 0.1% non-European (I used the term "white" in my original toot, they didn't), the furthest it could narrow that bit of DNA was to sub-Saharan Africa. And now that's been replaced with 0.2% "unclassified."

Sign in to participate in the conversation
social.coop

social.coop is a cooperatively-run corner of the Fediverse. The instance is democratically governed by its members, who generally share an interest in the co-op model, but topics of discussion range widely.

If you are interested in joining our community, please review our Bylaws and Code of Conduct. If you agree with them, you may apply for membership on our instance via this link

Our instance is supported by sliding scale contributions of $1-10/mo made via Open Collective. You must have an active Open Collective account to apply for membership; you may set one up here