What's your favorite technical book, and why?

@elplatt "Commodore 64 Programmer's Reference Guide" as it introduced me to all aspects of computers.

"The C Programming Language 2ed." I got a lot of mileage out of that small book.

"Racing the Beam" A fun look at a bygone era.

Any of the books in the "The Architecture of Open Source Applications" series. Just a great set of work on craft that you can dip in and out of.

"The Annotated Turing" made a difficult, but fundamental, computing topic easier to approach.

I'll stop there...

@elplatt
Probably the DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5, tbh. I studied to be a mental health professional, not an engineer.

Otherwise, Computer Systems: A Programmer's Perspective (mine is 2nd edition, but I think there is a third now). It was where I first was introduced to computer science.

@elplatt
I thought I said: The DSM is the standard codex for mental health disorders in the U.S. and the second is important to me because it was my starting place in CompSci.

@elplatt Dungeons & Dragons Player's Handbook 4th Edition

It took an incredible amount of weird, abscract information and created a color-coded card system that produces user-specific indices. I'd love to see other technical books written with an inherent, tangible information sorting system.

@elplatt not sure if it's *the* favorite, but the manual of VisualJ++ (yeah, I'm old) did a pretty good job introducing me to OOP.

The introduction to Static Analysis of Structures by P. Komodromos was another. I read it when it was still lecture notes but it simplifies a hard subject brilliantly in order to explain it.

@qwazix I learned java when 1.0.2 was the newest release, so I feel ya :)

@elplatt Not sure if GEB counts for you:
Gödel, Escher, Bach
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G%C3%B6d
It got me into math and classical music and a bit of biology as well as programming.
Everyone else is responding with a programming language howto, so I'm not sure.
Another influential read from back then was en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Soul still cool imo.

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